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seafood, seafood restaurants, seafood allergies, allergic reactions, nutrition, hydroponics, hydroponic gardening

Seafood allergies are caused by the protein that is found in fish. Fortunately, seaweed doesn't contain any fish protein.

Seafood Restaurants:

If eating at a seafood restaurant, you should be cautious because seaweed can become contaminated by fish protein. They can share the same countertops, cookware and utensils. Even if you are not eating any form of seafood, sushi rolls that are vegetarian are being prepared on the same countertops as sushi with fish.

Seafood Allergies:

Some people are only allergic to a specific fish but it is advised that you check with your doctor before moving on to other seafood dishes. Seafood allergies cause your immune system to react to fish protein on a very high scale.

Some of the most common symptoms from seafood allergy reactions are inflammation and swelling. Swelling takes place in skin, lungs and sinuses. If you suffer from arthritis and have a seafood allergy, you could suffer from a good deal of joint pain. Therefore, it is highly recommended you steer clear of seafood.

If you suffer from seafood allergies, you will probably have an allergic reaction to other forms of seafood products, such as gelatin. In case you're unaware of the content in gelatin, it is often made from the skin or bones of fish. Some people cannot take fish oil supplements for the same reasons.

Kelp Allergies:

Kelp is used as an herbal supplement and found in some medications. Should you consume these supplements, there's a good chance you will have an allergic reaction.

Severe allergic reactions are facial swelling, hives and shortness of breath which could lead to anaphylactic shock. If this should happen, contact a doctor immediately. Consult with your doctor and have the clinic test you for a possible kelp allergy. You should probably stay away from ingesting any form of kelp until you receive your medical results.

About Kelp:

Kelp is a type of ocean seaweed that looks similar to a tree, and is harvested in the ocean. It comes in a variety of colors: green, red and brown. Kelp is widely used medicinally for various conditions such as thyroid disorders, digestive disorder, arthritis, and iodine deficiencies.

Always be cautious if you suffer from any form of seafood allergies. Seaweed that is packaged and sold without any contamination of fish protein will not give you a reaction. Do your homework and look into the origins of the seaweed before incorporating it into your diet.

Should you have a condition that is commonly treated by medications containing kelp, make sure your doctor is aware you have seafood allergies. He or she will prescribe something else for your treatment.

Hydroponic Gardening:

Seaweed has amazing benefits, along with other plants on this planet. It would be a shame to limit yourself to just a small selection. Why don't you start your own hydroponic garden in your home for excellent, fresh produce?!

Hydroponic gardens are a snap to setup. Purchase a grow box, plant lights, some water filters and excellent nutrients for your plants. Grow your own herbs or vegetables, and throw in a few flowers along the way!

You can enjoy fresh foods in the dead of winter, by harvesting directly from your indoor garden! Add healthy seaweed to your salads today. Bon Appetit!

asian recipes, healthy food, seafood, seaweed, diet, delicious, health, nutrition, japanese

The New Seafood: Cooking with Seaweed

Gourmet seafood isn't just fish, calamari, crab, lobster, shrimp and other shellfish. Plants from the sea are becoming a culinary craze all across the country and are cropping up on menus at some of the finest restaurants around the world. Seaweed can be a delicious addition to your diet, and one that offers incredible health benefits at the same time.

The Nutritional Benefits of Seaweed

Seaweed has long been a staple of Asian and Scandinavian cooking, where aquatic freshwater and saltwater plants are readily available. Now, more and more people are adding seaweed to recipes, largely for the health benefits of the plants. A single serving of seaweed provides more immune system-boosting vitamin C than a serving of orange, grapefruit and other citrus fruits. In addition, seaweed is a natural source of vitamin D, providing more than what's found in a glass of milk. A serving of seaweed also treats your body to iron needed for producing healthy red blood cells, iodine for supporting thyroid function and the essential immune system mineral zinc. You'll also get a heaping dose of omega-3 fatty acids, the essential healthy fats that many people take fish and krill oil capsules to treat their bodies to get the benefits of.

Types of Seaweed for Cooking

There are many types of seaweed available at Asian food stores and online with which to experiment in recipes. The three most commonly used types are:

  • Nori - these Japanese algae is usually sold as a dry-food in sheets. If you've ever eaten a maki sushi roll, you'll quickly recognize the crispy blackish-green seaweed as the wrapper most commonly used by sushi chefs.
  • Kombu - Made up of broad leaves, kombu is a staple in Japanese cuisine and can be purchased fresh or as a dry-food.
  • Wakame - Sold as a dry-food and then rehydrated, this type of seaweed has a bright green color and a flavor that is slightly sweet.

Ways to Enjoy Seaweed

There are a number of ways that you can enjoy seaweed at home. Here are just a few ideas to get you started:

  1. Take sheets of nori and bake them in the oven as a potato chip alternative that is great for dipping and rich in vitamins and minerals.
  2. Add a small bit of kombu to a sauce to bring a touch of unique flavor.
  3. Use crumbled nori in marinades for fish, chicken or seafood.
  4. Rehydrate wakame and serve it in an Asian dressing with octopus, shrimp or crab for a DIY version of a seaweed salad.
  5. Crisp kombu in a skillet and then crumble it. Use it in place of salt on all types of foods for delicious, healthy seasoning.
  6. Soak wakame and add it to a stir-fry with mushrooms, vegetables and your favorite protein like seafood or chicken.

Adding seaweed to your diet will please your palate and supply your body with essential vitamins and minerals. Don't be afraid to experiment. Dry-food seaweed is simple to work with and guaranteed to bring nutritious results.

 

0 Comments | Posted in News Fruits & Vegetable Gardening Recipes By Florence B. Harrell

The red blood cells in your body carry the oxygen to your vital organs and tissues while removing the carbon dioxide. The blood cells are red because they contain hemoglobin which is very rich in iron. The marrow of the bone generates the production of red blood cells, but you can increase that production and create a healthier you in the process.

This is because not consuming enough iron in your daily diet may cause anemia, the state in which your body produces fewer red blood cells than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can affect your health and energy levels in a number of negative ways. Therefore, it is important to consume foods that are rich in iron as well as other vitamins, minerals and nutrients that provide your body with what it needs to stay active, healthy and strong.

Foods Rich in Iron, Folic Acid and B-12

There are several foods that offer plenty of iron for your body to use and create new red blood cells. Red meats, organs such as livers and kidneys along with dark, leafy green vegetables like kale and spinach. In addition, dried raisins, beans, lentils and dried prunes are also great sources of iron that keeps your blood supply rich in oxygen.

You’ll also want to consume foods rich in folic acid or Vitamin B9 as well since it helps in the development of red blood cells. Increasing the amount of folic acid in your body may prevent anemia from occurring. Many of the foods that contain plenty of folic acid include sources of iron as well, such as leafy green vegetables, kale, spinach and dried beans. There are also other sources such as breads, cereals, nuts and peas that also contain folic acid.

The Vitamin B12 also helps in the production of red blood cells as well by helping to prevent abnormal divisions of cells in the bone marrow which may create smaller, immature cells known as megaloblasts which do not transport enough oxygen to the body. Foods rich in B12 include breakfast cereals, dairy products, fish, beef liver, eggs and nutritional yeast.

How Seaweed Increases your Red Cell Count

Of all the foods listed that helps in the production of red blood cells, seaweed is arguably the best in terms of combining iron with plenty of other vitamins and minerals. Seaweed offers many health benefits and is one of the plants people have been cooking with for thousands of years. Whether you choose freshwater or saltwater seaweed, it makes for excellent recipes and snacks that provide many benefits to the creation of red blood cells.

Sea life such as crab, octopus, shrimp, krill and foods such as calamari offer plenty of seafood recipes for the diet. Seaweed contains all the benefits of these creatures while having very little fat and few calories, which makes it a great compliment to your dinner table. While seaweed may not be the complete answer to increasing your red blood cell count, it is a vital one that offers many other benefits as well.

0 Comments | Posted in News By Karen B. Vance

Seafood is one of the foods recommended by nutritionists and physicians to serve as a foundation for a healthy, balanced diet. Fish and shellfish like shrimp and crab are rich in lean protein, low in saturated fat and packed with healthy vitamins, minerals and essential fatty acids. Still, despite all the health benefits of seafood, many people are hesitant to work with lobster, octopus, calamari and fish in their home kitchens.

If you'd like to start enjoying fish and seafood dishes at home, here are some tips to help you get started:

- When choosing freshly caught fish, look for four signs of freshness: red gills, clear, shiny eyes, a mild odor and shiny skin.

- When purchasing skinned fillets, choose fish that is all one color. You should not see brown spots, and its hue should be vibrant throughout.

- Keep fresh fish and seafood in the refrigerator wrapped in plastic surrounded by ice. It will keep this way for one to two days.

- If you do not intend to cook with fish or seafood within one to two days, you can freeze fish.

- Shrimp, crab, lobster and other shellfish can be purchased pre-cooked and flash frozen for simple use in recipes. You can also cook many recipes with dry fish if you're concerned about freshness.

- When you thaw frozen fish or seafood, do so in the refrigerator, not in the microwave or by running it under warm water. Always cook with the fish or shellfish the day that you thaw it.

- Pin bones are best removed from fish fillets using needle-nose pliers. Just press down on the fish to expose the bones and pull them out.

- Over-marinating fish can leave it being mushy and unappealing in texture. Keep marinating times to a maximum of 30 minutes. Do not pour leftover marinade over the cooked fish, as this can result in food poisoning.

- Overcooking fish is the biggest reason for unpleasant odors in the kitchen. Always cook your fish for a few minutes less than what is suggested in recipes. Make a small cut in the fish and examine the meat. It should form flakes easily.

- When cooking with shellfish like clams and oysters, discard any that are open. This indicates that the seafood is already dead and no longer fresh.

- Avoid cross-contamination when preparing seafood dishes. Don't put cooked fish onto a plate or cutting surface where you had placed raw fish and don't use the same utensils with cooked and uncooked fish. Clean counter tops with an antibacterial solution after cooking to remove microbes.

- Serve cooked fish with sliced lemons or limes to enhance flavor and balance any strong tastes.

If you'd like to try your hand at cooking with dry fish, be sure to shop Cantinastar for a wide variety of options for use in recipes or for enjoying as snacks.

0 Comments | Posted in News By Karen B. Vance

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